For HR managers, recruiters, and hiring managers, it’s important to remember that the Biotechnology, Pharmaceuticals, and Life Sciences fields require very specific skills. This means job descriptions targeted to biotech and pharma talent need to work hard to outline the exact abilities, background, and experience. Writing job descriptions to attract biotech talent is so important. However, it’s easy to miss important aspects of crafting a job description to attract top Biotech talent. The language used in many job ads can prevent candidates from understanding the job!

Well-written job descriptions do more than help you recruit effectively. They also communicate the organization’s deepest cultural values – thereby attracting the right people for the right reasons. They also lead to long term employee retention, engagement, and satisfaction.

Here are some suggestions on how a detailed job description can make that happen:

Provide the Job Title

This may seem like a no-brainer, but the job title will set the tone for both the job description and the kinds of applicants you get. If you say “engineer” or “technician,” you could get people who may or may not be suited for the open role. If you say, “Biomedical Engineer,” you get a winnowed-down pool of applicants looking specifically for that kind of job.

Offer a General Overview of the Role

How does this job fit in with the organization? Are there direct reports? No personal details, but this quick one- or two-sentence overview would let the reader know that the newly hired Microbiologist reports to the VP of Biomedical and Industrial Products.

Roles and Responsibilities

A hiring manager doesn’t need to provide a minute-by-minute breakdown. But it’s okay to provide some highlights that cover the most important aspects of the job. By including this information, candidates know what to expect and can match up their own skills and experience before applying.

Give a Salary Range (if Possible)

This item can help avoid wasted time with candidates who are qualified but are seeking a higher salary. It can also set reasonable expectations if an entry-level employee is somehow thinking about senior-level compensation.

Level of Experience

If you’re hiring someone for a mid-career role, it’s important to note that a certain level of experience is necessary. This is especially true when listing required education levels. If it’s more of an entry-level position, specify that as well. This can help weed out applicants that are either overqualified or under-qualified.

List Benefits and Perks

Part of attracting candidates is showing what your company offers outside of the day-to-day work. A general overview of the benefits a good way to flesh out a job description. Examples include types of insurance offered, HSA savings plans, retirement savings, flexible hours, paid vacations, and education reimbursement. A quick benefit list (nothing too detailed) is a way to add some quick selling points to the job description.

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Conclusion

As a hiring professional, you know that if you want to fill a position well, you have to get the best possible candidates to apply (or you’ll find yourself staring down this same job description a few months from now). Crafting a clear, concise, and attention-getting job description will go a long way toward making your hiring process as efficient and successful as possible.

Sci.bio is a leading recruitment and search firm based in Boston. We specialize in finding and hiring the best talent to fill temporary openings, long-term positions, and executive roles in the Biotechnology, Pharmaceuticals, and the Life Sciences industries. To learn more, visit our website today!