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Managers: Preparing for the Year Ahead

Managers: Preparing for the Year Ahead

For managers, the new year is typically a mix of emotions. On the one hand, it’s an exciting time as people feel more energized after the holiday break and are enthusiastic about the year ahead. It can even bring a sense of relief–the prior year is rearview and there’s an opportunity for a fresh start.

On the other hand, the new year can be daunting with new initiatives and budgets, and the pressure to make it all happen quickly. On top of that, there’s the stress of reviews and hiring that typically come this time of year. In general, the new year brings a renewed sense of pressure to keep everyone above and below happy.

With some preparation, the New Year doesn’t have to be so overwhelming. You can harness that New Year optimism by making resolutions that will allow you to start on the right foot and stay there. Let us help you get started. We suggested a few resolutions for managers and pulled helpful links.

Give effective feedback during performance reviews. In 2020, think of ways you can give your employees more effective feedback on their performance. If there is something your employee needs to work on, remember to focus on changeable behaviors rather than personality traits and work together to brainstorm a clear action plan for improvement. Even if your review is positive, try to be as specific as possible so that the compliments feel genuine and personalized.

Show your team you appreciate their hard work. Research shows that people do more for people who appreciate them. Everybody gets busy with the fast pace of biotech, so try setting a monthly calendar reminder to bring in a treat for the team or add a final to-do list item after a presentation to thank the team members who contributed.

Thank you note and keyboard on desk

Update your job descriptions. In 2020, try adding a sentence or two to your job descriptions that give it some flair. Most job descriptions are fairly generic and don’t highlight much of what sets your company apart or give job seekers an idea of the company culture.

Plan the recruitment cycle for the year. Don’t get caught scrambling to fill a role during the busy season. Start the recruitment cycle ahead of time so you can give some thought to who you are looking to add to your team. You will be able to find better candidates by thinking about things like cultural fit ahead of time.

Make time to review the accomplishments and the goals of the department. In the fast-paced world of biotech, it can be easy to get caught in maintenance mode where you are constantly executing. The New Year is the perfect time to reflect on all that your team has done, and plan for the year ahead.

coworker high five

Do any of these resolutions resonate with you more than others? If so, why?

Good luck!

Quick Hits on How Your Company Can Save on Recruiting Costs

Quick Hits on How Your Company Can Save on Recruiting Costs

 

Shrink Your Bottom LineHiring “right” can be an expensive, time intensive process. a recruiter or recruiting firm can run the gradient of talent ‘ally’ to ineffective gatekeeper and from a cost perspective: tremendous value to incredible waste of money. It is crucial to fully qualify and be comfortable with the individuals, team or firms that are performing your recruitment as they are a direct reflection on  your company(good or bad). so carefully consider the option you choose. With this in mind,

Regardless of approach, There are a number of things you can do to improve on the quality of your recruitment process so that you can recruit right the first time and avoid employee turnover which can cost as little as 20% for less senior roles and as much as 200% for Executive positions. As a manager, a personal list of the essential qualities and qualifications you want in  your employee, and don’t compromise on them. Retention is the better half of hiring.

Quick Hits:

 

 

Automate

Thanks to technology, you can automate much of the application screening process. It’s a win-win situation. Programs can work around the clock pulling together a short list of top candidates with your required skills and experience and have it waiting on your desk when you arrive in the morning. By saving your time, you will also save your energy for more productive tasks. Undoubtedly, this will lead to higher quality work and thus, more success in your endeavors.

 

Social Media

Where Do Top Performers Hang Out?You don’t need to spend outrageous amounts of money to get your vacancy out to the masses. Social media is a fantastic free resource for finding candidates who are actively looking for work. So, get creative and think about where your top performers hang out! Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are the most popular platforms used by both job seekers and passive candidates. Take the time to connect with passive candidates as well because they may become job seekers tomorrow.

 

One-Click Apply

We don’t just use our cell phones, tablets and other mobile devices to access the web; we’re attached to them. So, if you want to bring in top talent fast, then make your application mobile-friendly. A one-click feature for candidates to apply with, such as a simple tap of the screen, will bring in more potential employees that you imagined.

 

Current Employees

Ask current employees for recommendations. Since they already work for you, your employees understand the value of bringing in contributing employees. Moreover, candidates who have been recommended by current staff have the added benefit of boosting overall workforce morale. We all enjoy going to work when we like the people we work with.

 

Sci.bio RecruitingFind out how Sci.bio Recruiting can help your company take its scientific, clinical and technical hiring to another level. Our scaleable, recruiting services affords our clients maximum flexibility, uncommon value and a high level of scientific and business insight.

 

Telephone Interviews: A Guide to Success

Telephone Interviews: A Guide to Success

by Clifford Mintz

cartoon ringing telephoneTelephone interviews are an inexpensive and quick way for employers to screen prospective job candidates. Generally speaking, employers use phone interviews to verify that a candidate’s personal information, qualifications and skill sets in his/her curriculum vitae is correct, accurate and consistent with what employers may have learned about an applicant online. Another use of phone interviews is to determine whether or not a job candidate has the requisite oral communications skills required to perform the job that he/she applied for. Finally, and perhaps more nefariously, telephone interviews can allow employers to garner insight into a job candidate’s race, ethnicity or national origin (this can easily be discerned by accents speech patterns and colloquial use of English) and immigration status.

In today’s tight job market, an outstanding command of the English language and permanent residency or US citizenship are what many American employers prefer in permanent full time employees. However, this does not mean that well qualified, non-native English speakers will not be invited to participate in a face-to-face job interview To increase the possibility of a face-to-face, job candidates can do a variety of things to  prepare for and optimize his/her performance during phone interviews.

These include:

1. Use a landline. You don’t want to risk having problems with cell phone service. It is irritating for employers to conduct interviews if the call breaks up frequently or is dropped. If you don’t have a land line or access to one, make sure that the telephone interview is conducted in a location with as much cell phone service as possible.

2. Keep your resume and job qualifications readily available.  In fact, lay out all of your materials in front of you before the call. This includes your resume, notes about your career objective and skill sets/qualifications for the job and anything else you that think may be helpful during the interview.

3. Steer clear of distractions. Find a quiet place to interview and stay there! There shouldn’t be any noise in the background to distract you or the hiring manager. However, it is understandable that this can be tricky if you have young children at home who need your attention. When you set up your interview appointment, try to schedule it for as precise a time or window as possible. That way, you are able to avoid possible distractions.

4. Speak slowly and clearly. When you speak to people in face-to-face situations, you are better able to understand what they are saying or asking because you can see their mouth move and observe their body language. Of course, neither you nor the interviewer will be able to do this over the phone. Therefore, it is important to speak clearly and more slowly than you would if you were talking face-to-face to him/her. If you cannot hear the interviewer, politely ask him/her to repeat a question. If this doesn’t work, blame the poor sound quality on your phone and say “I’m really sorry, it’s hard to hear you, and the volume on my phone just won’t go up!”

5. Beware of jokes or sarcastic remarks. Jokes or sarcastic remarks that may be deemed harmless in face-to-face conversations can be misinterpreted during a phone interview because an interviewer cannot see your body language or facial expressions when a comment is made. Also, an employee who is sarcastic or prone to joke telling is may not be considered professional to some hiring manager. Therefore it is a good idea during a phone interview to maintain your professionalism; stay on target with the interview topics and focus on the key information about you that will get you hired.

6. No eating, drinking or chewing gum! While eating, drinking and chewing gum are typical things that people do, none of these activities should be performed during a phone interview. They can interfere with your ability to communicate and are considered to be unprofessional behaviors (unless of course you are working through a lunchtime meeting after you are hired).

7. Turn off all electronic devices.  The goal of a telephone interview is to let a prospective employer that you are serious, focused and keenly interested in the job that you are interviewing for. There is nothing more annoying, disruptive or rude then hearing an email alert or vibrating phone during a conversation.  If you want to get invited to face-to-face interview, then turn off all electronic devices (tablets, laptops, televisions etc) before the telephone interview begins. 

8. Prepare questions ahead of time. At the end of many telephone interviews, hiring managers typically ask whether or not there are any questions. Therefore, it is a good idea to have some. Asking questions signals to the interviewer that you did your “homework” about the company/organization and are seriously interested in the job opportunity.  Some examples of questions are: “What is the start date for the job?” “What software/equipment will I be using?”

Remember;DO NOT ask about salary or benefits. These questions are best left for face-to-face interviews. However, if the interviewer asks about salary requirements then you should be prepared provide an answer. Typically, it is a good idea to provide a salary range and if you are reluctant to offer that information it is acceptable to say “a salary commensurate with persons with my qualifications and years of experience.

While these recommendations cannot eliminate employer bias or job discrimination, using them to prepare for an upcoming telephone interview will signal to prospective employers you are professional, serious and extremely interested in the job opportunity. And, hopefully, your performance will be sufficient to garner an invitation to participate in a face-to-face, onsite job interview.

Until next time…

Good Luck and Good Job Hunting!!!!!!!!!!!