Recruiter Spotlight: Carter

Recruiter Spotlight: Carter

Authors:  Carter Lewis and Natalie Zimmerman

Carter Lewis is one of Sci.bio Recruiting’s Senior Scientific Recruiting Associates.  As his three-year anniversary at Sci.bio approaches, it’s a perfect time to reflect on his journey as a recruiter, and what he’s learned during his time in the world of life sciences recruiting so far.

How did you get into recruiting, and how did you end up at Sci.bio?

I found my way into the recruiting world shortly after graduating from college. At a heavily project-based school, I enjoyed immersing myself in the science of biotechnology during my short academic tenure, but I did not envision myself sitting on the bench and running experiments all day. I started looking into alternative biotech careers where I could be involved in this innovative industry and connect with leaders in the space without following the traditional scientist route. I stumbled across a posting for a biotech recruiting position and wanted to learn more about it. I talked with Eric along with other Sci.bio recruiters and enjoyed candid conversations about the biotech recruiting career path. I thought it would be a perfect fit for my aspirations, and the welcoming environment of Sci.bio sealed the deal!

What do you enjoy most about being a recruiter?

My favorite aspect of recruiting is the people I meet every day. I have the privilege of meeting leaders in the industry, and listening as they explain their technology and how it could be used to positively impact the quality of life of patients across the world. I also have the opportunity to meet scientists and learn something new from them each day while making meaningful connections.

What do you find most challenging about recruiting?

Recruiting is not an easy profession. It requires thick skin to overcome rejection from prospects that aren’t interested, hiring managers with lofty expectations, and candidates that chose a different path. You need to be able to pick yourself up after a loss and persevere with a positive attitude to fill those tough positions.

What are your passions and interests outside of work?

I enjoy anything that involves staying active in the outdoors! I spend my summer weekends in NH, from backpacking trips in the White Mountains to mountain biking with friends. In the winter I travel north to ski at Sunday River or in the Vermont backcountry. I also take pride in cultivating all varieties of spicy peppers and tending to my succulents.

What do you think your greatest strength is as a recruiter?

While there are many challenges in recruiting, one that I excel at is managing client relationships. Some clients and hiring managers have very specific visions for who they are looking for and how they want to build out their team, while others need a lot of guidance. I walk the line between listening to their needs while also providing honest feedback on unattainable expectations. Their expertise is focused on science and their company’s direction, while ours is the recruiting market. It requires a collaborative effort to build out the perfect team for success.

What advice would you give to someone entering the world of biotech recruiting, or recruiting in general?

Hold yourself accountable. You are going to face challenges, you won’t fill every position, and you will have some failures. Growth requires taking a step back and evaluating yourself honestly. Assess what worked, learn from your mistakes, and steps you can take to improve and become a better recruiter.

I was fortunate enough to be mentored by successful recruiters like Mike Cordaro and Eric Celidonio and learned how important it was to watch and listen to other recruiters. Pick up some of their tips and tricks, learn from their mistakes, and form a recruiting style that works for you.

If you’re looking to fill a role with a highly qualified candidate, Sci.bio’s recruitment services can help. We know that no two clients are the same, so we provide customized recruiting support that adapts to a given client’s structure and needs and have placed successful candidates with a variety of companies. Please contact us to connect with a recruiter and discuss your needs, and follow us on LinkedIn to stay up to date.

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Recruiter Spotlight: Danielle Cox

Recruiter Spotlight: Danielle Cox

Authors: Danielle Cox and Natalie Zimmerman

Danielle Cox joined Sci.bio over five years ago and was one of the company’s first recruiters. Now a Scientific Recruiting Partner, Danielle juggles both contingency searches and hourly work, tailoring her approach depending on each client’s specific needs.

Read more below about Danielle’s journey as a recruiter, her passions outside of work, her valuable advice for those entering the field of life sciences recruiting, and more.

How did you get into recruiting, and how did you end up at Sci.bio?

I started my career in academic research, then moved to the biotech industry. In looking for a career change away from the bench, I took a position with a recruitment agency that focused on hiring scientists to place scientists in contract positions. I wanted to try something new within the industry and found that I really enjoyed meeting with clients, establishing new relationships and learning more about multiple sectors of the field. What I liked best was the rewarding feeling of a successful placement.

I came to Sci.bio after being recruited by our founder, Eric Celldonio. I was interested in the company as it was run with a team mentality and allowed a work/life balance which I appreciated having a young family at the time. This month I am celebrating my six-year anniversary!

What do you enjoy most about being a recruiter?

I enjoy helping people find jobs they love and contributing to my clients’ goals by helping them to build successful teams.

What do you find most challenging about recruiting?

Recruiting is a balance of highs and lows. You need to be able to pivot quickly and redirect your sinking searches to find success. This can be easier said than done, but it keeps things interesting.

What do you think your greatest strength is as a recruiter?

Persistence, and experience. I’m confident in my skills, but never afraid to add talent from my team to help in a difficult search. I appreciate a fresh perspective and a good team to lean on.

What advice would you give to someone entering the world of biotech recruiting, or recruiting in general?

As the saying goes, if it was easy everyone would do it. Always take opportunities to learn, and to network. Find a mentor and a company that has a good culture and supports their team.

What are your goals that you hope to accomplish as a recruiter?

I hope to continue driving top talent to my clients and helping people to reach their career goals. There’s always room for learning more, and it’s a pleasure to support the more junior members of my team and I hope to continue to do that as well.

What are your passions and interests outside of work?

Outside of work, I spend most of my time with my family. I have 4 kids, and 3 of them are in hockey, so we are often in ice rinks around New England! I am also a comprehensively certified Pilates teacher and have been teaching for almost 10 years and I love it!

Related Blogs:

  1. Recruiter Spotlight: Kay Chow
  2. Recruiter Spotlight: Sahana Nazeer
Year in Review: Our Blog Highlights of 2023

Year in Review: Our Blog Highlights of 2023

Author:  Natalie Zimmerman

Here’s a look back at ten of our blog articles which sparked the most conversation among clients, candidates, and recruiters alike in the last year:

Biotech Recruiting into the Dark: Hiring in Uncertain Economic Times

As we look towards 2024, this article outlines the growth trends within the biotech sector within the last few years, particularly in response to the Covid-19 boom in hiring.

How to Beat Recruiter Burnout

Perhaps especially useful to look back on at the end of a year – this article lays out ideas for avoiding and combating burnout as a recruiter.

The Biotech Culture Problem

Biopharma start-ups often tout the noble aspiration of curing all that ails the world. Many of these illustrious, high-flying organizations are in fact perpetuating ‘mistruths’; their claims of a virtuous, meritorious, transparent and science based approach are often misleading or outright untrue. Careful observation reveals some serious rifts, cultural divides, and outright lies beneath the surface, all of which our founder Eric Celidonio explores in this article.

Job Perks that Matter Most to Candidates

The pandemic has radically shifted the kinds of benefits employers will consider offering, as well as what is most desired by employees. This article outlines some of the most important job perks to the workforce of today, and how this has changed in recent years.

Most In-Demand Majors in Biotechnology

If you’re a student or recent graduate, you may be wondering what are the most in-demand majors for pharma companies right now – and, perhaps more importantly, what is driving demand? This article explores the most useful majors for college students wishing to enter the biotech industry.

Job Hopping as a Career Path: Is It Right for You?

Job hopping has become an increasingly common practice, but there are pros and cons. On the one hand, you probably want to upskill in your field, experiment with what you like, and ascend as quickly as possible in your career. On the other hand, you may crave a sense of stability at work, long-term office friendships with coworkers, and a track record of loyalty to flex to your next employer. A combo of personality, risk tolerance, and career goals – and this article – can help you determine your path.

As a Life Scientist, Do You Need Communication Skills?

You might think of a “science job” as a lab-coat-wearing, number-crunching, sitting-and-calculating kind of affair – but basic communications skills are very useful in the modern life science and biotech industries. This article debunks the myth that life scientists don’t rely on communication skills, and outlines some useful communications skills for the life scientist of 2023, and how to go about cultivating them.

Best Practices in Recruiting

Whether you’re considering becoming a recruiter, in the midst of a recruiting career, or interested in using recruiting services, this article compiles our best recruiting-related blogs and will give you the insights to optimize your recruiting strategy no matter which side of the equation you’re on.

Improve Your Memory to Improve Your Relationships

Research shows that the average American consumes at least 100,000 words and 34 GB of data per day. Given all of the information you consume on a daily basis, your brain cannot possibly store everything in your long term memory. But remembering aspects about a person is essential, not just for creating new relationships with people, but also for strengthening existing relationships: it shows you genuinely care about them. Recalling details, and asking additional questions, will cause them to associate positive memories with you – people love to talk about themselves. Here are some tried and true techniques to help you improve your memory, and better your social and professional relationships in the process.

Are Your Friends Sabotaging Your Career?

It’s important to consider whether those you choose to surround yourself with truly have your best interests at heart. Whether because of jealousy, insecurity, or because they are simply not a true friend, there are some for whom your successes might be unpleasant, who may relish in your failure as it comforts them about their own shortcomings. This article explores the concept of ‘Schadenfreude’, referring to the delight one might feel in another’s misfortune, and how to identify those in your life who might not truly have your back.

 

If you’re looking to fill a role with a highly qualified candidate, Sci.bio’s recruitment services can help. We know that no two clients are the same, so we provide customized recruiting support that adapts to a given client’s structure and needs, and have placed successful candidates with a variety of companies. We also work with a variety of candidates from new graduates to experienced executives, with myriad open roles, and we pride ourselves on connecting our highly discerning clients with candidates who fit their specific needs. Please contact us to connect with a recruiter and discuss your needs, check out our job search page to see current openings, and follow us on LinkedIn to stay up to date.

Related Blogs:

  1. Working in Biotech
  2. Hiring in Biotech
  3. Life Sciences Today
Are Your Friends Sabotaging Your Career?

Are Your Friends Sabotaging Your Career?

Authors: Eric Celidonio, Natalie Zimmerman

Who might be sabotaging your career?

Are you working hard at a job search but making very little headway? Do you feel as though you’re stuck in one place, struggling to advance your career further? Although it’s not easy to admit, it’s possible that your progress towards these goals is being hindered by the very people you call your friends.

friends

While we like to consider our friends advocates and allies in everything we do, it’s important to consider whether those you choose to surround yourself with truly have your best interests at heart. Whether because of jealousy, insecurity, or because they are simply not a true friend, there are some for whom your successes might be unpleasant, who may relish in your failure as it comforts them about their own shortcomings.

This concept is often called ‘Schadenfreude’, a German term combining the words “harm” and “joy”, and refers to the delight one might feel in another’s misfortune. The phenomenon is a natural human instinct, and even the most well-meaning of us experience it, sometimes in response to the news of the failure of a friend. This is often subconscious, a feeling that arises involuntarily, especially when one is feeling insecure or struggling through a difficult patch, when it can be comforting to feel as if someone else is struggling as well. The important distinction, however, is whether one feeds this kind of thought, or strives to root for a friends’ successes with what they can control.

Even generally benevolent friends, though, can occasionally drag you down through no conscious effort of their own. Humans are inherently social creatures, and are acutely aware of hierarchy and social status, which influences our perspective and our decisions even when we are not aware of it. Though many of us like to think we do not make snap judgments about people until we get to know them, people tend to judge, at least initially, by what we can easily perceive: for example, by one’s social clique. You should of course, surround yourself and associate with those you enjoy being with, who enrich your life beyond your work, but it’s important to balance personal and professional benefits carefully if you are trying to advance in your career.

Most of us have had the unfortunate experience of discovering someone is not who we had initially thought them to be. When choosing the people with which you spend your time, don’t leave anything to chance. By taking the time to properly assess friends and colleagues, you can strive to minimize any detrimental impact.

Identifying those who might not truly enrich your life, who might not have your best interest at heart, is not easy. Here are some signs to look out for:

tug of war

  1. They make promises but don’t come through. There is a reason it is so often said that “actions speak louder than words”.
  2. Chronic complainers or naysayers. Those who often like to complain but without an attempt at a solution. At the very least, their negative thought patterns could drag you down with them.
  3. They lack empathy. Simply put, if they don’t have the ability, or choose not, to show empathy in important situations, this is a signal to distance yourself.
  4. Exaggerators, fibbers, or outright liars. Those who make a habit of stretching, or avoiding, the truth, are prominent in toxic work environments.
  5. Self Aggrandizers. People who have the habit of inflating themselves may have the tendency to minimize others, you included.
  6. Gossipers. If they’re constantly talking badly about other people to you, think about what they might be saying behind your back.
  7. They always take, but never offer anything in return. A person who more often than not takes from you without giving is not a true friend, but someone who may simply be using you.
  8. Chronically angry people. People prone to perpetual anger are dangerous, and have the potential to similarly affect your outlook on life over time.
  9. They don’t take ownership or never seem to be at fault. If one is unable or unwilling to take responsibility for their actions, it’s impossible to talk through difficult moments with them. This tendency will eventually backfire on you.
  10. The jealous. With a fake smile, relishing the opportunity to take you down, these can be the most damaging of the bunch.

Time to move on.

alarm clock in teal circle

Do you recognize any of these traits in those you surround yourself with? In that case, perhaps not all of your friends truly have your best interest in mind, and it may be time to make some changes.

Of course, it can be extremely hard to let go of familiar faces, and those you’ve known for a long time. However, if your friends are holding you back, or bringing you down, in these ways, they aren’t true friends, they are eventual liabilities. Cut ties with those who don’t have your back.

At the very least, while you are at critical career junctures, you’ll want to limit your exposure to anyone who doesn’t have your best interest in mind. Surrounding yourself with positive people, especially those from which you can learn, is key – not only in successful career advancement, but in your overall happiness.

Here at Sci.bio, we work with a variety of candidates from new graduates to experienced executives, and have myriad open roles. We pride ourselves on connecting our highly discerning clients with candidates who fit their specific needs. Check out our job search page to see current openings and follow us on LinkedIn for more information.

References:

  1. Schadenfreude: A psychologist explains why we love to see others fail

Related Blogs:

  1. Loyalty Over Merit in Career Advancement
  2. Improve Your Memory to Improve Your Relationships
  3. The Biotech Culture Problem
Loyalty Over Merit in Career Advancement

Loyalty Over Merit in Career Advancement

Authors: Tara Smylie, Natalie Zimmerman

Many people think getting hired, and career advancement in general, happen primarily based on merit. But is this always the case? The answer is complicated.

Too often, we’re told that our skills, grades, awards and accolades are what truly seal the deal. Of course, these achievements can help your chances of getting hired, or moving up in your career. However, the old adage, “it’s not what you know, but who” rings true – and nowhere is it more pronounced than in the employment world.

This principle doesn’t just apply to getting an entry-level job. Building strong relationships with powerful people can land you new opportunities, promotions, and general good favor in any professional environment, throughout your career.

So, what creates strong loyalty? There is no one answer to this question, but it’s in fact a mix of rapport, dedication, and the ability to tell a compelling story. Below, we’ll explore how these factors come into play to make loyalty a competitive factor in the hiring process.

Benefits of Building Loyalty over Merit

It comes down to this: when someone is loyal to you, they are inclined to support you above others – for reasons that may seem arbitrary to an onlooker. But loyalty is built on relationships, and relationships, particularly professional relationships, do not happen arbitrarily.

The formation of these long-lasting, loyalty-building relationships in the workplace boils down to the art of showing just the right amount of humanity. Of course, in a workplace setting, it’s important to keep it professional – but letting little bits of yourself be known can help to build a personal rapport.

Extensive research has also shown that networking like this can lead to more job opportunities, broader and deeper knowledge of your industry, more potential for innovation, faster career advancement, and an increase in status in the professional world. In short: the stronger and more loyal your relationships, the more likely they are to lead to these opportunities.

Inspiring Loyalty

When it comes to building a connection, the little things matter. Indeed, it’s not always the flashier, ultra-extroverted moments of interaction that count. Sometimes simply holding the door, making someone a coffee, or paying the occasional sincere compliment go a long way.

Equally important is to show dedication. Your colleagues and higher-ups want to see that you’re emotionally present within your role at the company – that you understand the company’s values, goals, and mission statement.

Most of all, it’s imperative that you tell your story. This is the most fundamental communication skill you’ll need in the workplace – even and especially as a life scientist. Though it may not always seem to be true, the people you work with want to know who you are. What’s more, if they don’t know what you want out of the job, they won’t be able to help you achieve your goals if opportunities to do so come their way.

Often, a person who feels loyal to you will have a reason – whether that’s an affectionate personal anecdote they remember, a feeling of admiration for your accomplishments, or a sentiment of shared struggle. Therefore, if there’s someone whose loyalty you hope to gain, the best way to start is to connect with them on a personal level – and build your professional relationship from there.

How do Loyalty and Merit Mix?

One of the best ways to inspire loyalty and good favor at work is simple: be good at your job. It’s not just a number-crunching affair, though; it’s also about how you make your supervisors feel. If you show them you’ve taken the time to really understand the ins and outs of your position, and are committed to delivering top-notch performance, they will know they don’t have to worry about the work you bring to the table, and feel warmer, and ultimately more loyal towards you.

Long Term Benefits of Loyalty

When a person, or company as an entity, is loyal to you, they’re invested not just in your performance but in the story behind it. As they watch your career unfold, they’ll likely want to assist you in advancing your career in any way they can. As such, loyalty can lead to benefits even years down the line.

The feeling that your company is loyal to you can also make you subjectively happier at work. While it’s nice to get a good performance review or numerical return on a project, it can be truly enrich your experience at work to feel valued on a one-to-one, personal level.

Bottom Line: Personality over Paper

A resume can get you in the door – sometimes – but ultimately, it’s the relationships and rapport you build that really seal the deal.

Here at Sci.bio, we work with a variety of candidates from new graduates to experienced executives, and have myriad open roles. We pride ourselves on connecting our highly discerning clients with candidates who fit their specific needs. Check out our job search page to see current openings and follow us on LinkedIn for more information.

References:

  1. Learn to Love Networking
  2. As a Life Scientist, Do You Need Communications Skills?
  3. The Importance of Building Positive Relationships in the Workplace

Related Blogs: