Recruiter Spotlight: Carter

Recruiter Spotlight: Carter

Authors:  Carter Lewis and Natalie Zimmerman

Carter Lewis is one of Sci.bio Recruiting’s Senior Scientific Recruiting Associates.  As his three-year anniversary at Sci.bio approaches, it’s a perfect time to reflect on his journey as a recruiter, and what he’s learned during his time in the world of life sciences recruiting so far.

How did you get into recruiting, and how did you end up at Sci.bio?

I found my way into the recruiting world shortly after graduating from college. At a heavily project-based school, I enjoyed immersing myself in the science of biotechnology during my short academic tenure, but I did not envision myself sitting on the bench and running experiments all day. I started looking into alternative biotech careers where I could be involved in this innovative industry and connect with leaders in the space without following the traditional scientist route. I stumbled across a posting for a biotech recruiting position and wanted to learn more about it. I talked with Eric along with other Sci.bio recruiters and enjoyed candid conversations about the biotech recruiting career path. I thought it would be a perfect fit for my aspirations, and the welcoming environment of Sci.bio sealed the deal!

What do you enjoy most about being a recruiter?

My favorite aspect of recruiting is the people I meet every day. I have the privilege of meeting leaders in the industry, and listening as they explain their technology and how it could be used to positively impact the quality of life of patients across the world. I also have the opportunity to meet scientists and learn something new from them each day while making meaningful connections.

What do you find most challenging about recruiting?

Recruiting is not an easy profession. It requires thick skin to overcome rejection from prospects that aren’t interested, hiring managers with lofty expectations, and candidates that chose a different path. You need to be able to pick yourself up after a loss and persevere with a positive attitude to fill those tough positions.

What are your passions and interests outside of work?

I enjoy anything that involves staying active in the outdoors! I spend my summer weekends in NH, from backpacking trips in the White Mountains to mountain biking with friends. In the winter I travel north to ski at Sunday River or in the Vermont backcountry. I also take pride in cultivating all varieties of spicy peppers and tending to my succulents.

What do you think your greatest strength is as a recruiter?

While there are many challenges in recruiting, one that I excel at is managing client relationships. Some clients and hiring managers have very specific visions for who they are looking for and how they want to build out their team, while others need a lot of guidance. I walk the line between listening to their needs while also providing honest feedback on unattainable expectations. Their expertise is focused on science and their company’s direction, while ours is the recruiting market. It requires a collaborative effort to build out the perfect team for success.

What advice would you give to someone entering the world of biotech recruiting, or recruiting in general?

Hold yourself accountable. You are going to face challenges, you won’t fill every position, and you will have some failures. Growth requires taking a step back and evaluating yourself honestly. Assess what worked, learn from your mistakes, and steps you can take to improve and become a better recruiter.

I was fortunate enough to be mentored by successful recruiters like Mike Cordaro and Eric Celidonio and learned how important it was to watch and listen to other recruiters. Pick up some of their tips and tricks, learn from their mistakes, and form a recruiting style that works for you.

If you’re looking to fill a role with a highly qualified candidate, Sci.bio’s recruitment services can help. We know that no two clients are the same, so we provide customized recruiting support that adapts to a given client’s structure and needs and have placed successful candidates with a variety of companies. Please contact us to connect with a recruiter and discuss your needs, and follow us on LinkedIn to stay up to date.

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Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Author: Natalie Zimmerman

Despite the increasingly remote nature of work in our post-pandemic world, location remains one of the most important factors for candidates, and a crucial component in choosing a recruiting agency to assist with a search – especially within the realm of life sciences recruiting. Whether home to distinguished research universities, biotech companies, or cutting-edge startups, every biotech hub boasts its own unique ecosystem and research goals, and direct experience within that specific environment can be instrumental in recruiting and hiring the right candidate for a role.

Sci.bio Recruiting was founded after decades of experience in the Boston-Cambridge life sciences world. While Sci.bio is still headquartered in the Boston area, we’ve also grown nationally: we now have employees all over the country, and serve clients nationwide.

From Biotech Beach in California to Genetown in Boston, our recruiters live and work where you live and work. Read on for a selection of our recruiting partners and leaders in locations across the U.S.


Brian Riehle – Managing Partner in California

Brian RiehleBrian Riehle lives in San Diego, California, a part of the Biotech Beach area.

He joined Sci.bio in 2023 to build out the company’s presence in the California biotech space. Having worked in recruiting for 15 years, much of that time in California, he possesses a unique understanding of the specific research environment in Biotech Beach, and heads Sci.bio’s business development on the West Coast.

Brian has found it fulfilling to work within the burgeoning biotech space in San Diego: “Empowering the future of biotech and pharmaceutical companies in San Diego, as a staffing professional, is like weaving the threads of innovation. Bridging the realms of academia and industry, we are the linchpins, connecting brilliant minds with visionary companies, fostering growth, and shaping tomorrow’s breakthroughs.”

He’s confident that San Diego will continue to be host to groundbreaking biotech research: “San Diego is a major hub for biotech and will continue to attract talent and innovative companies to the area.”


Martha Navarro – Senior Recruiting Associate in South Carolina

Martha NavarroMartha Navarro lives in South Carolina and works as a Senior Recruiting Associate at Sci.bio.

Though she grew up in California and only recently relocated to South Carolina, she appreciates the growing research presence in the area: “I’m a Scientific Recruiter living in the Florence area of South Carolina. Even though I’m relatively new here, I’ve discovered there’s more to the state than just its Southern charm! Cities like Charleston, Greenville, Columbia, and Clemson are developing a research presence. As a recruiter, it’s exciting to see this growth and it inspires me to continue forming connections. I hope that with the years to come, South Carolina will be known not only for their southern hospitality but as an emerging research hub where both locals and non-locals can experience the warm welcome I’ve received.”

Martha also speaks Spanish, which has enhanced her ability to communicate with candidates from various backgrounds and in myriad locations: “My ability to speak both English and Spanish has also helped me engage with a diverse range of candidates and opened the door to new opportunities.”


Laura Helmick Laura Helmick – Managing Partner in North Carolina

Laura Helmick, one of Sci.bio Recruiting’s Managing Partners, grew up and continues to live in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Area, colloquially known as Research Triangle Park.

Having spent much of her life in this area, she’s uniquely able to recognize the way the opportunities in the area have expanded throughout the years: “I grew up in Chapel Hill when there was only 1 high school. 30+ years later, it’s hard to truly digest how much the RTP area has changed. Regardless of the tremendous growth, I still see that southern charm and small town feel but (thankfully) a lot more diversity and opportunities, professionally and personally. The early research and discovery out of Duke, NC State and UNC really seemed to feed the growth in this area for businesses like CROs, CDMOs, and Biotechs; it just keeps expanding! The ‘Triangle’ area has so much to offer. I can’t imagine living anywhere else and I’m excited to see what the future holds for this area.”


Stacy SaltzerStacy Saltzer – Senior Recruiting Partner in Ohio

Stacy Saltzer lives in Akron, Ohio and works as a Senior Recruiting Partner and Director of Sourcing at Sci.bio.

With over 25 years of experience in RPO and executive search, she now brings her expertise to the BioMidwest area: “Living and working in Akron, Ohio has been an enriching experience for me, both professionally and personally. From a biotech recruiting standpoint, I’ve had the opportunity to engage with a diverse talent pool and contribute to the growth of the industry while working remotely. Additionally, being able to converse with our clients in French has been advantageous, allowing me to foster stronger relationships and better serve our global clientele. On a personal level, Akron offers a welcoming community, vibrant culture, and convenient access to nature, making it a great place to call home.”


Beyond the major biotech hubs of Boston/Cambridge, San Diego, and RTP, we also have employees in over 20 states, including Colorado, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Texas, and Vermont, to name a few. Our recruiters are deeply ingrained within the same communities in which you live and work, and uniquely poised to help you find and hire successful candidates wherever you are.

If you’re looking to fill a role with a highly qualified candidate, Sci.bio’s recruitment services can help. We know that no two clients are the same, so we provide customized recruiting support that adapts to a given client’s structure and needs, and have placed successful candidates with a variety of companies. Please contact us to connect with a recruiter and discuss your needs, and follow us on LinkedIn to stay up to date.

Sources:

Related Blogs (3):

 

Recruiter Spotlight: Danielle Cox

Recruiter Spotlight: Danielle Cox

Authors: Danielle Cox and Natalie Zimmerman

Danielle Cox joined Sci.bio over five years ago and was one of the company’s first recruiters. Now a Scientific Recruiting Partner, Danielle juggles both contingency searches and hourly work, tailoring her approach depending on each client’s specific needs.

Read more below about Danielle’s journey as a recruiter, her passions outside of work, her valuable advice for those entering the field of life sciences recruiting, and more.

How did you get into recruiting, and how did you end up at Sci.bio?

I started my career in academic research, then moved to the biotech industry. In looking for a career change away from the bench, I took a position with a recruitment agency that focused on hiring scientists to place scientists in contract positions. I wanted to try something new within the industry and found that I really enjoyed meeting with clients, establishing new relationships and learning more about multiple sectors of the field. What I liked best was the rewarding feeling of a successful placement.

I came to Sci.bio after being recruited by our founder, Eric Celldonio. I was interested in the company as it was run with a team mentality and allowed a work/life balance which I appreciated having a young family at the time. This month I am celebrating my six-year anniversary!

What do you enjoy most about being a recruiter?

I enjoy helping people find jobs they love and contributing to my clients’ goals by helping them to build successful teams.

What do you find most challenging about recruiting?

Recruiting is a balance of highs and lows. You need to be able to pivot quickly and redirect your sinking searches to find success. This can be easier said than done, but it keeps things interesting.

What do you think your greatest strength is as a recruiter?

Persistence, and experience. I’m confident in my skills, but never afraid to add talent from my team to help in a difficult search. I appreciate a fresh perspective and a good team to lean on.

What advice would you give to someone entering the world of biotech recruiting, or recruiting in general?

As the saying goes, if it was easy everyone would do it. Always take opportunities to learn, and to network. Find a mentor and a company that has a good culture and supports their team.

What are your goals that you hope to accomplish as a recruiter?

I hope to continue driving top talent to my clients and helping people to reach their career goals. There’s always room for learning more, and it’s a pleasure to support the more junior members of my team and I hope to continue to do that as well.

What are your passions and interests outside of work?

Outside of work, I spend most of my time with my family. I have 4 kids, and 3 of them are in hockey, so we are often in ice rinks around New England! I am also a comprehensively certified Pilates teacher and have been teaching for almost 10 years and I love it!

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  1. Recruiter Spotlight: Kay Chow
  2. Recruiter Spotlight: Sahana Nazeer
The Collapse of Internal Talent Acquisition Functions – Challenges and Solutions

The Collapse of Internal Talent Acquisition Functions – Challenges and Solutions

Author:  Tara Smylie

Picture this: You’re a biotech company on the cutting edge of innovation, racing against the clock to develop life-changing therapies and technologies. But there’s a problem lurking in the shadows – your internal talent acquisition function is crumbling under the weight of escalating costs, a scarcity of specialized training, and pressing time constraints.

Sound familiar? You’re not alone. In the fast-paced world of life sciences and biotech, many organizations’ internal talent acquisition processes are simply not keeping up with their recruitment needs. But fear not: in this blog post, we’ll explore the challenges plaguing internal talent acquisition teams – and uncover effective solutions to help you navigate the turbulent HR landscape of the modern day.

Internal Talent Acquisition in the Life Sciences: How’s it Going?

The life sciences and biotech industries are burgeoning with new discoveries and advancements. As a result, the demand for skilled professionals in such areas is soaring, and talent acquisition in these fields is struggling to keep up. In the face of fierce competition for top talent and rapidly evolving industry requirements, companies are facing an uphill battle to secure candidates that truly suit their needs.

Three Major Challenges to Internal HR Teams in 2024

Internal talent acquisition teams in the life sciences and biotech sectors are grappling with a myriad of challenges, including:

  • Escalating Costs: Recruiting and hiring top talent can be a costly endeavor, particularly for specialized roles in the life sciences. Internal talent acquisition teams often find themselves burdened with rising expenses from sourcing, screening, and onboarding new candidates.
  • Skills Shortages: Rapid technological advancements and shifting industry demands have created a skills gap, leaving internal recruiters scrambling to find candidates with the right expertise. Unfortunately, a shortage of qualified talent can impede organizational growth and innovation.
  • Time Constraints: In a competitive job market, time is of the essence. Internal talent acquisition functions must contend with tight deadlines and high-pressure environments, leaving little room for error or delays in the recruitment process.

External Recruitment Agencies: to Use or Not to Use?

Amidst the many challenges to the modern internal hiring process, many life science and biotech companies are turning to external recruitment agencies. Here are some key benefits of partnering with an external agency:

  • Specialized Expertise: External recruitment agencies have in-depth knowledge of the life sciences industry and its unique talent landscape. They can leverage this expertise to identify, attract, and secure top talent that aligns with your organization’s specific objectives.
  • Broader Candidate Reach: External agencies have extensive networks and resources for sourcing candidates, both locally and globally. This broader reach allows them to tap into a diverse pool of talent, including passive candidates who are not actively seeking new opportunities.
  • Cost Efficiency: Contrary to popular belief, partnering with an external recruitment agency can be a cost-effective solution. By outsourcing recruitment activities, companies can reduce overhead costs associated with internal hiring processes, such as advertising, screening, and training.

Keys to a Seamless Recruiting Experience

Given the mushrooming demand for talent in the life sciences and biotech fields and the increasingly complex STEM hiring landscape, internal talent acquisition teams are finding it challenging to keep up. The good news: by understanding these challenges and exploring effective responses, organizations can navigate the recruitment landscape with confidence. Whether it’s leveraging the expertise of external recruitment agencies or implementing innovative hiring strategies, investing in talent acquisition is essential for driving long-term success in an increasingly competitive market.

If you’re looking to fill a role with a highly qualified candidate, Sci.bio’s recruitment services can help. We know that no two clients are the same.  So we provide customized recruiting support that adapts to a given client’s structure and needs and have placed successful candidates with a variety of companies. Please contact us to connect with a recruiter and discuss your needs, and follow us on LinkedIn to stay up to date.

Sources:
1. “The State of Talent Acquisition 2023” – Life Sciences Recruitment Report, Industry Insights, 2023.
2. “Navigating the Talent Crunch: Strategies for Recruiting in the Life Sciences Industry” – Biotech HR Trends, Talent Solutions, 2022.
3. “The Rise of External Recruitment Agencies in Life Sciences” – Recruitment Trends and Insights, Biotech Today, 2021.
4. “The Cost of Keeping a Position Open” – Talent Acquisition Insights, Sci.Bio, 2023.

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A Researcher, a Communicator, or Something in Between? Knowing Who to Hire for Each Role

Year in Review: Our Blog Highlights of 2023

Year in Review: Our Blog Highlights of 2023

Author:  Natalie Zimmerman

Here’s a look back at ten of our blog articles which sparked the most conversation among clients, candidates, and recruiters alike in the last year:

Biotech Recruiting into the Dark: Hiring in Uncertain Economic Times

As we look towards 2024, this article outlines the growth trends within the biotech sector within the last few years, particularly in response to the Covid-19 boom in hiring.

How to Beat Recruiter Burnout

Perhaps especially useful to look back on at the end of a year – this article lays out ideas for avoiding and combating burnout as a recruiter.

The Biotech Culture Problem

Biopharma start-ups often tout the noble aspiration of curing all that ails the world. Many of these illustrious, high-flying organizations are in fact perpetuating ‘mistruths’; their claims of a virtuous, meritorious, transparent and science based approach are often misleading or outright untrue. Careful observation reveals some serious rifts, cultural divides, and outright lies beneath the surface, all of which our founder Eric Celidonio explores in this article.

Job Perks that Matter Most to Candidates

The pandemic has radically shifted the kinds of benefits employers will consider offering, as well as what is most desired by employees. This article outlines some of the most important job perks to the workforce of today, and how this has changed in recent years.

Most In-Demand Majors in Biotechnology

If you’re a student or recent graduate, you may be wondering what are the most in-demand majors for pharma companies right now – and, perhaps more importantly, what is driving demand? This article explores the most useful majors for college students wishing to enter the biotech industry.

Job Hopping as a Career Path: Is It Right for You?

Job hopping has become an increasingly common practice, but there are pros and cons. On the one hand, you probably want to upskill in your field, experiment with what you like, and ascend as quickly as possible in your career. On the other hand, you may crave a sense of stability at work, long-term office friendships with coworkers, and a track record of loyalty to flex to your next employer. A combo of personality, risk tolerance, and career goals – and this article – can help you determine your path.

As a Life Scientist, Do You Need Communication Skills?

You might think of a “science job” as a lab-coat-wearing, number-crunching, sitting-and-calculating kind of affair – but basic communications skills are very useful in the modern life science and biotech industries. This article debunks the myth that life scientists don’t rely on communication skills, and outlines some useful communications skills for the life scientist of 2023, and how to go about cultivating them.

Best Practices in Recruiting

Whether you’re considering becoming a recruiter, in the midst of a recruiting career, or interested in using recruiting services, this article compiles our best recruiting-related blogs and will give you the insights to optimize your recruiting strategy no matter which side of the equation you’re on.

Improve Your Memory to Improve Your Relationships

Research shows that the average American consumes at least 100,000 words and 34 GB of data per day. Given all of the information you consume on a daily basis, your brain cannot possibly store everything in your long term memory. But remembering aspects about a person is essential, not just for creating new relationships with people, but also for strengthening existing relationships: it shows you genuinely care about them. Recalling details, and asking additional questions, will cause them to associate positive memories with you – people love to talk about themselves. Here are some tried and true techniques to help you improve your memory, and better your social and professional relationships in the process.

Are Your Friends Sabotaging Your Career?

It’s important to consider whether those you choose to surround yourself with truly have your best interests at heart. Whether because of jealousy, insecurity, or because they are simply not a true friend, there are some for whom your successes might be unpleasant, who may relish in your failure as it comforts them about their own shortcomings. This article explores the concept of ‘Schadenfreude’, referring to the delight one might feel in another’s misfortune, and how to identify those in your life who might not truly have your back.

 

If you’re looking to fill a role with a highly qualified candidate, Sci.bio’s recruitment services can help. We know that no two clients are the same, so we provide customized recruiting support that adapts to a given client’s structure and needs, and have placed successful candidates with a variety of companies. We also work with a variety of candidates from new graduates to experienced executives, with myriad open roles, and we pride ourselves on connecting our highly discerning clients with candidates who fit their specific needs. Please contact us to connect with a recruiter and discuss your needs, check out our job search page to see current openings, and follow us on LinkedIn to stay up to date.

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  1. Working in Biotech
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