Recruiter Spotlight: Carter

Recruiter Spotlight: Carter

Authors:  Carter Lewis and Natalie Zimmerman

Carter Lewis is one of Sci.bio Recruiting’s Senior Scientific Recruiting Associates.  As his three-year anniversary at Sci.bio approaches, it’s a perfect time to reflect on his journey as a recruiter, and what he’s learned during his time in the world of life sciences recruiting so far.

How did you get into recruiting, and how did you end up at Sci.bio?

I found my way into the recruiting world shortly after graduating from college. At a heavily project-based school, I enjoyed immersing myself in the science of biotechnology during my short academic tenure, but I did not envision myself sitting on the bench and running experiments all day. I started looking into alternative biotech careers where I could be involved in this innovative industry and connect with leaders in the space without following the traditional scientist route. I stumbled across a posting for a biotech recruiting position and wanted to learn more about it. I talked with Eric along with other Sci.bio recruiters and enjoyed candid conversations about the biotech recruiting career path. I thought it would be a perfect fit for my aspirations, and the welcoming environment of Sci.bio sealed the deal!

What do you enjoy most about being a recruiter?

My favorite aspect of recruiting is the people I meet every day. I have the privilege of meeting leaders in the industry, and listening as they explain their technology and how it could be used to positively impact the quality of life of patients across the world. I also have the opportunity to meet scientists and learn something new from them each day while making meaningful connections.

What do you find most challenging about recruiting?

Recruiting is not an easy profession. It requires thick skin to overcome rejection from prospects that aren’t interested, hiring managers with lofty expectations, and candidates that chose a different path. You need to be able to pick yourself up after a loss and persevere with a positive attitude to fill those tough positions.

What are your passions and interests outside of work?

I enjoy anything that involves staying active in the outdoors! I spend my summer weekends in NH, from backpacking trips in the White Mountains to mountain biking with friends. In the winter I travel north to ski at Sunday River or in the Vermont backcountry. I also take pride in cultivating all varieties of spicy peppers and tending to my succulents.

What do you think your greatest strength is as a recruiter?

While there are many challenges in recruiting, one that I excel at is managing client relationships. Some clients and hiring managers have very specific visions for who they are looking for and how they want to build out their team, while others need a lot of guidance. I walk the line between listening to their needs while also providing honest feedback on unattainable expectations. Their expertise is focused on science and their company’s direction, while ours is the recruiting market. It requires a collaborative effort to build out the perfect team for success.

What advice would you give to someone entering the world of biotech recruiting, or recruiting in general?

Hold yourself accountable. You are going to face challenges, you won’t fill every position, and you will have some failures. Growth requires taking a step back and evaluating yourself honestly. Assess what worked, learn from your mistakes, and steps you can take to improve and become a better recruiter.

I was fortunate enough to be mentored by successful recruiters like Mike Cordaro and Eric Celidonio and learned how important it was to watch and listen to other recruiters. Pick up some of their tips and tricks, learn from their mistakes, and form a recruiting style that works for you.

If you’re looking to fill a role with a highly qualified candidate, Sci.bio’s recruitment services can help. We know that no two clients are the same, so we provide customized recruiting support that adapts to a given client’s structure and needs and have placed successful candidates with a variety of companies. Please contact us to connect with a recruiter and discuss your needs, and follow us on LinkedIn to stay up to date.

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Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Author: Natalie Zimmerman

Despite the increasingly remote nature of work in our post-pandemic world, location remains one of the most important factors for candidates, and a crucial component in choosing a recruiting agency to assist with a search – especially within the realm of life sciences recruiting. Whether home to distinguished research universities, biotech companies, or cutting-edge startups, every biotech hub boasts its own unique ecosystem and research goals, and direct experience within that specific environment can be instrumental in recruiting and hiring the right candidate for a role.

Sci.bio Recruiting was founded after decades of experience in the Boston-Cambridge life sciences world. While Sci.bio is still headquartered in the Boston area, we’ve also grown nationally: we now have employees all over the country, and serve clients nationwide.

From Biotech Beach in California to Genetown in Boston, our recruiters live and work where you live and work. Read on for a selection of our recruiting partners and leaders in locations across the U.S.


Brian Riehle – Managing Partner in California

Brian RiehleBrian Riehle lives in San Diego, California, a part of the Biotech Beach area.

He joined Sci.bio in 2023 to build out the company’s presence in the California biotech space. Having worked in recruiting for 15 years, much of that time in California, he possesses a unique understanding of the specific research environment in Biotech Beach, and heads Sci.bio’s business development on the West Coast.

Brian has found it fulfilling to work within the burgeoning biotech space in San Diego: “Empowering the future of biotech and pharmaceutical companies in San Diego, as a staffing professional, is like weaving the threads of innovation. Bridging the realms of academia and industry, we are the linchpins, connecting brilliant minds with visionary companies, fostering growth, and shaping tomorrow’s breakthroughs.”

He’s confident that San Diego will continue to be host to groundbreaking biotech research: “San Diego is a major hub for biotech and will continue to attract talent and innovative companies to the area.”


Martha Navarro – Senior Recruiting Associate in South Carolina

Martha NavarroMartha Navarro lives in South Carolina and works as a Senior Recruiting Associate at Sci.bio.

Though she grew up in California and only recently relocated to South Carolina, she appreciates the growing research presence in the area: “I’m a Scientific Recruiter living in the Florence area of South Carolina. Even though I’m relatively new here, I’ve discovered there’s more to the state than just its Southern charm! Cities like Charleston, Greenville, Columbia, and Clemson are developing a research presence. As a recruiter, it’s exciting to see this growth and it inspires me to continue forming connections. I hope that with the years to come, South Carolina will be known not only for their southern hospitality but as an emerging research hub where both locals and non-locals can experience the warm welcome I’ve received.”

Martha also speaks Spanish, which has enhanced her ability to communicate with candidates from various backgrounds and in myriad locations: “My ability to speak both English and Spanish has also helped me engage with a diverse range of candidates and opened the door to new opportunities.”


Laura Helmick Laura Helmick – Managing Partner in North Carolina

Laura Helmick, one of Sci.bio Recruiting’s Managing Partners, grew up and continues to live in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Area, colloquially known as Research Triangle Park.

Having spent much of her life in this area, she’s uniquely able to recognize the way the opportunities in the area have expanded throughout the years: “I grew up in Chapel Hill when there was only 1 high school. 30+ years later, it’s hard to truly digest how much the RTP area has changed. Regardless of the tremendous growth, I still see that southern charm and small town feel but (thankfully) a lot more diversity and opportunities, professionally and personally. The early research and discovery out of Duke, NC State and UNC really seemed to feed the growth in this area for businesses like CROs, CDMOs, and Biotechs; it just keeps expanding! The ‘Triangle’ area has so much to offer. I can’t imagine living anywhere else and I’m excited to see what the future holds for this area.”


Stacy SaltzerStacy Saltzer – Senior Recruiting Partner in Ohio

Stacy Saltzer lives in Akron, Ohio and works as a Senior Recruiting Partner and Director of Sourcing at Sci.bio.

With over 25 years of experience in RPO and executive search, she now brings her expertise to the BioMidwest area: “Living and working in Akron, Ohio has been an enriching experience for me, both professionally and personally. From a biotech recruiting standpoint, I’ve had the opportunity to engage with a diverse talent pool and contribute to the growth of the industry while working remotely. Additionally, being able to converse with our clients in French has been advantageous, allowing me to foster stronger relationships and better serve our global clientele. On a personal level, Akron offers a welcoming community, vibrant culture, and convenient access to nature, making it a great place to call home.”


Beyond the major biotech hubs of Boston/Cambridge, San Diego, and RTP, we also have employees in over 20 states, including Colorado, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Texas, and Vermont, to name a few. Our recruiters are deeply ingrained within the same communities in which you live and work, and uniquely poised to help you find and hire successful candidates wherever you are.

If you’re looking to fill a role with a highly qualified candidate, Sci.bio’s recruitment services can help. We know that no two clients are the same, so we provide customized recruiting support that adapts to a given client’s structure and needs, and have placed successful candidates with a variety of companies. Please contact us to connect with a recruiter and discuss your needs, and follow us on LinkedIn to stay up to date.

Sources:

Related Blogs (3):

 

Recruiter Spotlight: Danielle Cox

Recruiter Spotlight: Danielle Cox

Authors: Danielle Cox and Natalie Zimmerman

Danielle Cox joined Sci.bio over five years ago and was one of the company’s first recruiters. Now a Scientific Recruiting Partner, Danielle juggles both contingency searches and hourly work, tailoring her approach depending on each client’s specific needs.

Read more below about Danielle’s journey as a recruiter, her passions outside of work, her valuable advice for those entering the field of life sciences recruiting, and more.

How did you get into recruiting, and how did you end up at Sci.bio?

I started my career in academic research, then moved to the biotech industry. In looking for a career change away from the bench, I took a position with a recruitment agency that focused on hiring scientists to place scientists in contract positions. I wanted to try something new within the industry and found that I really enjoyed meeting with clients, establishing new relationships and learning more about multiple sectors of the field. What I liked best was the rewarding feeling of a successful placement.

I came to Sci.bio after being recruited by our founder, Eric Celldonio. I was interested in the company as it was run with a team mentality and allowed a work/life balance which I appreciated having a young family at the time. This month I am celebrating my six-year anniversary!

What do you enjoy most about being a recruiter?

I enjoy helping people find jobs they love and contributing to my clients’ goals by helping them to build successful teams.

What do you find most challenging about recruiting?

Recruiting is a balance of highs and lows. You need to be able to pivot quickly and redirect your sinking searches to find success. This can be easier said than done, but it keeps things interesting.

What do you think your greatest strength is as a recruiter?

Persistence, and experience. I’m confident in my skills, but never afraid to add talent from my team to help in a difficult search. I appreciate a fresh perspective and a good team to lean on.

What advice would you give to someone entering the world of biotech recruiting, or recruiting in general?

As the saying goes, if it was easy everyone would do it. Always take opportunities to learn, and to network. Find a mentor and a company that has a good culture and supports their team.

What are your goals that you hope to accomplish as a recruiter?

I hope to continue driving top talent to my clients and helping people to reach their career goals. There’s always room for learning more, and it’s a pleasure to support the more junior members of my team and I hope to continue to do that as well.

What are your passions and interests outside of work?

Outside of work, I spend most of my time with my family. I have 4 kids, and 3 of them are in hockey, so we are often in ice rinks around New England! I am also a comprehensively certified Pilates teacher and have been teaching for almost 10 years and I love it!

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  1. Recruiter Spotlight: Kay Chow
  2. Recruiter Spotlight: Sahana Nazeer
Year in Review: Our Blog Highlights of 2023

Year in Review: Our Blog Highlights of 2023

Author:  Natalie Zimmerman

Here’s a look back at ten of our blog articles which sparked the most conversation among clients, candidates, and recruiters alike in the last year:

Biotech Recruiting into the Dark: Hiring in Uncertain Economic Times

As we look towards 2024, this article outlines the growth trends within the biotech sector within the last few years, particularly in response to the Covid-19 boom in hiring.

How to Beat Recruiter Burnout

Perhaps especially useful to look back on at the end of a year – this article lays out ideas for avoiding and combating burnout as a recruiter.

The Biotech Culture Problem

Biopharma start-ups often tout the noble aspiration of curing all that ails the world. Many of these illustrious, high-flying organizations are in fact perpetuating ‘mistruths’; their claims of a virtuous, meritorious, transparent and science based approach are often misleading or outright untrue. Careful observation reveals some serious rifts, cultural divides, and outright lies beneath the surface, all of which our founder Eric Celidonio explores in this article.

Job Perks that Matter Most to Candidates

The pandemic has radically shifted the kinds of benefits employers will consider offering, as well as what is most desired by employees. This article outlines some of the most important job perks to the workforce of today, and how this has changed in recent years.

Most In-Demand Majors in Biotechnology

If you’re a student or recent graduate, you may be wondering what are the most in-demand majors for pharma companies right now – and, perhaps more importantly, what is driving demand? This article explores the most useful majors for college students wishing to enter the biotech industry.

Job Hopping as a Career Path: Is It Right for You?

Job hopping has become an increasingly common practice, but there are pros and cons. On the one hand, you probably want to upskill in your field, experiment with what you like, and ascend as quickly as possible in your career. On the other hand, you may crave a sense of stability at work, long-term office friendships with coworkers, and a track record of loyalty to flex to your next employer. A combo of personality, risk tolerance, and career goals – and this article – can help you determine your path.

As a Life Scientist, Do You Need Communication Skills?

You might think of a “science job” as a lab-coat-wearing, number-crunching, sitting-and-calculating kind of affair – but basic communications skills are very useful in the modern life science and biotech industries. This article debunks the myth that life scientists don’t rely on communication skills, and outlines some useful communications skills for the life scientist of 2023, and how to go about cultivating them.

Best Practices in Recruiting

Whether you’re considering becoming a recruiter, in the midst of a recruiting career, or interested in using recruiting services, this article compiles our best recruiting-related blogs and will give you the insights to optimize your recruiting strategy no matter which side of the equation you’re on.

Improve Your Memory to Improve Your Relationships

Research shows that the average American consumes at least 100,000 words and 34 GB of data per day. Given all of the information you consume on a daily basis, your brain cannot possibly store everything in your long term memory. But remembering aspects about a person is essential, not just for creating new relationships with people, but also for strengthening existing relationships: it shows you genuinely care about them. Recalling details, and asking additional questions, will cause them to associate positive memories with you – people love to talk about themselves. Here are some tried and true techniques to help you improve your memory, and better your social and professional relationships in the process.

Are Your Friends Sabotaging Your Career?

It’s important to consider whether those you choose to surround yourself with truly have your best interests at heart. Whether because of jealousy, insecurity, or because they are simply not a true friend, there are some for whom your successes might be unpleasant, who may relish in your failure as it comforts them about their own shortcomings. This article explores the concept of ‘Schadenfreude’, referring to the delight one might feel in another’s misfortune, and how to identify those in your life who might not truly have your back.

 

If you’re looking to fill a role with a highly qualified candidate, Sci.bio’s recruitment services can help. We know that no two clients are the same, so we provide customized recruiting support that adapts to a given client’s structure and needs, and have placed successful candidates with a variety of companies. We also work with a variety of candidates from new graduates to experienced executives, with myriad open roles, and we pride ourselves on connecting our highly discerning clients with candidates who fit their specific needs. Please contact us to connect with a recruiter and discuss your needs, check out our job search page to see current openings, and follow us on LinkedIn to stay up to date.

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  1. Working in Biotech
  2. Hiring in Biotech
  3. Life Sciences Today
Best Practices in Recruiting

Best Practices in Recruiting

Authors: Gabrielle Bauer & Tara Smylie

Big-picture ideas to help recruiters—and those who use them—play their A game

INTRODUCTION to BEST PRACTICES IN RECRUITING

In an era of rapid growth for biotech and life science companies, STEM-savvy talent experts play an especially important role in the ecosystem. Becoming a life science recruiter takes knowledge of the industry, a wide social network, and business acumen. Working with one takes a keen sense of what you’re looking for, and the ability to put it into words.

Whether you’re considering becoming a recruiter, in the midst of a recruiting career, or interested in using recruiting services, this survey article will give you the insights and confidence to do it right.

BECOMING A RECRUITER

Before you walk the recruiter’s walk, you need to know who you are and where you’re heading.

Recruiting: who knew? Most life science grads don’t immediately think of recruiting as a career option – but they should. Variety, flexibility, and mobility into a variety of other career paths are just some of the perks it offers. And let’s not forget about the money: if working on commission, recruiters can enjoy an uncapped earning potential.

Working as a recruiter, you’ll also get the chance to draw on your own previous work experience. As an example, perhaps you’ve spent your most recent working years in a lab, dealing with regulations and assisting with complex processes. In such a case, you can start out by billing yourself as a recruiter specializing in lab operations, and build out your services from there.

Another reason to consider recruiting: getting a head start on future career ideas for yourself. This holds especially true if you’re still looking to map out a long-term career trajectory, but it can apply to anyone. There’s nothing like being a matchmaker to show you what makes a great partnership – workplace or otherwise. As you learn the qualities most important for different roles, you’ll naturally gain insights about the positions that would suit you best.

But skills are just one piece of the pie: personality also comes into play. According to a survey of nearly 9,000 talent experts, recruiters tend to be enterprising, outgoing, and have a strong sense of social responsibility. The through-line: they fundamentally enjoy being with people. If you’re a natural networker and enjoy leveraging your contacts to help out friends in need, recruiting ticks all the important boxes. This doesn’t mean the profession is off-limits to quieter types, though. If recruiting appeals to you, start exploring the possibilities.

What to expect

As of April 2022, the life sciences had the second-lowest unemployment rate of all U.S. industries. It’s a job-seeker’s market, with companies often scrambling to find talent they urgently need. Business is booming for recruiters, too: 86% of life science talent acquisition professionals say they expect their teams to either grow or remain stable in 2023.

In many ways, the life sciences are a dream come true for recruiters. The industry features a higher-than-average percentage of highly skilled positions, and turnover is high. Career possibilities in the field continue to diversify, with burgeoning niches in personalized medicine, data analytics, and digital health, among others. As a life science recruiter, you’ll participate in the excitement of matching these novel skills with organizations who desperately need them.

Top trends in talent acquisition and recruiting

If you want to attract candidates who are up-to-date and in-the-know, you’ll have to get on their level. As of 2023, top trends in recruiting include:

  • Remote interviewing: This facilitates collaborative hiring.
  • Emphasis on candidate experience: Companies that prioritize employee well-being are more successful than those that don’t.
  • Diversity, equity and inclusion: Statistics show that a culturally rich workplace is good for business.
  • Contingent workers. Businesses and workers alike have realized how profitable contract work can be.

Niching and branding

As a new recruiter, you may feel torn. Do you take on as many projects as possible, or niche up early to establish a specialized reputation and client base? The short answer: a bit of both. While you don’t need to specialize too quickly or narrowly, it’s worth honing in on some areas of specialty as you develop your business.

Let’s say you’ve established some connections with microbiologists and feel confident you can quickly place top-quality talent in the field. If you promote yourself accordingly, your clients and network associates will pick up on your specialized knowledge and experience in this area. Should they ever need a microbiologist, they’ll remember your name.

Examples of recruitment specialties in the life sciences include gene therapy, immuno-oncology, clinical development, medical devices, medical writing, and many more. To narrow it down, ask yourself the following:

  • What kinds of positions do you find most interesting?
  • Does your previous recruiting experience point you in an obvious direction?
  • Do you have especially large networks in certain areas?

Use your answers to guide your decision process. Next step: spread the word. To create a compelling personal brand, keep a few fundamental W’s in mind: who do you recruit for, and what do you offer them? Why does recruiting mean so much to you? Answer these questions honestly and specifically, and you’ll attract a customer base that wants to buy what you’re selling.

As far as possible, keep your brand visuals consistent across all marketing tools, from your website to your business cards. Decide as soon as possible which font types, color scheme, design style, and logo you’re going to use for all your content. That’s not to say you can never change your style – just remember that consistency builds brand recognition and “brand memory,” leading clients and candidates to think of you first.

RECRUITING IQ

Like most professions, effective recruiting is more about working smart than about putting in long hours and hoping something sticks. A skilled recruiter understands the value of a network, and the synergy between professionalism and personal connections.

Nuts and bolts

Keep your expectations realistic. A biotech start-up, no matter how promising, won’t have the same gravitational pull that a large pharma company does. That said, the way you present a company to candidates carries a lot of power. Don’t misrepresent the organization, but feel free to talk about organizational goals, backstory, or employee mobility to pique their interest.

Second in your toolbox: face-to-face networking events. Where possible, add all new connections on LinkedIn and exchange social media identifiers. And as you forge new connections, remember: just because you don’t need a candidate now doesn’t mean they won’t be a great match for a future project. Relationship-building forms the core of recruiting, so you’ll want to cast a wide net to maximize your success.

To maximize social media engagement, make sure your social content is – you guessed it – engaging. Think images, graphics, and open-ended questions that stimulate discussion. On LinkedIn, posts that include photo content receive 98 percent more comments than those that feature text only. Keep this in mind as you build an online presence.

Another digital trend: today’s social media users are looking to see the “human” side of a brand or organization. As you optimize your social media for recruitment, don’t only post about projects and accomplishments. Mix things up a bit by posting about networking events, what led you to this career choice, and/or the difference you hope to make in the world as a recruiter.

Assessing your social media strategy

Every strategy must have an evaluation component, and social media is no exception. Here’s how to make sure you’re packing a punch with your digital outreach.

  • Set goals and priorities: Create a ranked list of your social media goals.
  • Audit your audience: Find out the type of content your audience likes best – or just ask them – and give them more of the same.
  • Monitor the competition: Find out how the successful competition is engaging their audience and consider pulling a few tricks from their book.
  • Set up a monitoring program: The popular Google Analytics reporting system, for example, can help you segment and identify the sources of your social traffic.

Keep it personal

Treat your candidates like people so they don’t fall through the cracks. When they don’t get the job, let them know why. This makes for a better end-to-end experience for them – and as a result, increases the likelihood that they’ll take your feedback, skill up, and come back even better prepared when the next opportunity arises.

To forge and maintain a connection with your candidate pool, advertise all new openings on social media, making sure your job postings are readable on mobile, and invite people to send you referrals. And don’t discount previous candidates who impressed you, but weren’t quite right at the time. Reconnecting with previous applicants can save you time, dollars, and a whole lot of stress. When you reach out, make sure to remind these former candidates who you are, how you know them, and what impressed you about their application the first time around.

Skill up during down times

When the hiring market is down, take the opportunity to hone your skills, strategize, and connect (or reconnect). The circumstances may have you feeling uncertain or anxious, but consider the bright side: less time spent on the daily grind means more time to work on your long-term goals. During a slower season, you can still reach out to employers and candidates and start building relationships for when you really need them.

A slower season also affords you the time to review your process. In particular, hone in on four key metrics: time to hire, cost per hire, usual sources of hire, and employment acceptance rates. Are these stats stacking up as you’d like them to? Maybe you could cut out a few formalities to streamline your process, or maybe you’re still subscribed to web recruitment services you no longer need. What feels like an endless lull in work will soon become a distant memory –and your current efforts will pay off when business picks up again.

WORKING WITH A RECRUITER

If you’re a life sciences company thinking of working with a recruiter, start with a basic assessment: why do it, which recruiter to work with, and how to work together.

Why use a recruiter in the first place

Specialized roles require a specialized search process. If you’re looking for an entry-level data analyst, you may be able to conduct the search on your own. But if you’re looking for, say, an experienced immunology consultant, a recruiter becomes a strategic asset. Sure, it costs more than doing it yourself – but considering the talent you find could stick around for years, the ROI will likely work in your favor.

Recruiters can also help you zero in on “cross-functional” candidates—people who bring unusual combinations of skills to the table. You’re more likely to find that microbiologist with management skills through a recruiter than on your own. And don’t underestimate the value of referrals from existing employees – especially when working with recruiters. A full 88 percent of businesses view referrals as their best hires, so it’s worth considering the value of this hiring pipeline. To maximize efficiency and avoid misunderstandings, you and your recruiter should establish a process for them to obtain employee referrals and follow up on the best ones.

Choose with care

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. When selecting a talent scout, the biggest red flag is dishonesty. If a recruiter displays “toxic positivity,” makes claims that sound unrealistic, or has an overly pushy sales pitch, they’re most likely trying to cover up a gap in their abilities.

Along with honesty and professionalism, experience in STEM fields should top your list of criteria. This doesn’t have to be a degree or a long-term job – courses, workshops, and previous recruitment experience in the industry can all give you a sense of their scientific background. If their LinkedIn profile doesn’t offer proof either way, but you still have a good feeling about working with them, reach out to them with questions to fill in the blanks.

To suss out a recruiter’s aptitude for your particular project, get very specific with your questions. If you’re considering someone who offers special expertise in science/biotech, be sure to ask how they tailor their services to the industry. This goes especially for niche, highly skilled positions: before you sign any contracts, they’ll need to prove they have a tried-and-true method of sourcing the best.

Top-five questions to ask candidate recruiters

  1. What is your search process, including for difficult-to-fill positions?
  2. Have you placed candidates in X or Y roles before?
  3. How do you handle clients with changing hiring needs?
  4. How do you manage referrals from internal employees?
  5. What is your approach to difficult-to-fill positions?

A model for all seasons

Selecting the right recruitment model is an art unto itself. If you’re hiring consistently and have the budget for it, an in-house recruiter may make the most sense. At the other end of the spectrum, a contingency recruiter can “pinch hit” for you if a hard-to-fill position calls for recruitment expertise beyond your usual requirements. As a further alternative, you can build a long-term partnership with the same external recruiter. With each new hire, they will gain a better and better sense of how your company works and how to best meet your talent needs.

When you need help finding a short-term candidate, consider the “temporary” and “temp-to-hire” recruitment models, which fulfill distinct strategic objectives. Temporary recruitment focuses on meeting short-term business demands. The temp-to-hire (a.k.a. temp-to-permanent) approach also seeks to meet a current need, but with the expectation that the temporary position will segue into a permanent one. Compared to the standard approach of giving new hires a probationary period, temp-to-hire saves costs and incurs less liability.

Whichever recruiting model you choose, a recruiter with an intelligent sourcing process puts you a step ahead. An essential precursor to recruiting, sourcing ensures that candidates meet a minimum qualification standard before being considered for a position. Find a recruiter you trust with sourcing, and you can rest easy knowing that every candidate you interview has met a suitable bar of skills and ambition.

Recruiter vs. headhunter: What’s the difference?

Headhunters find a “head” to fill a specific job, while recruiters work to fill many different job openings. Headhunters are typically called in to fill senior positions that require a unique blend of experience and skills. Recruiters often have an industry specialty and tend to establish longer-term relationships with both clients and candidates.

A LEG UP ON THE COMPETITION

The right recruiter will help you attract and retain the best, while saving time and resources.

Diving into the talent pool

In a competitive hiring market, a recruiter can help you hire quickly and efficiently. With demand for candidates outstripping supply, your usual hiring strategies may fall short. That’s where recruiters come in: between their existing network, referrals, and specialized outreach services, they can connect with candidates you would never know about on your own.

This includes people who need to wear more than one hat. The smartest talent experts understand that scientific skills come in many shades, and each role will call for a slightly different mix. Sure, one of your candidates might be an expert at clinical trial regulations – but that doesn’t mean they’re going to excel at long-term product strategy planning. With the help of a talent-optimization expert, you can ensure you’re not wasting all your efforts on square pegs.

The dreaded slowdown

If you experience a lag in company growth, financial concerns may cause you to hesitate to use recruiting services. While an understandable concern, working a recruiter into your budget could help revive your business. And when job candidates are scarce, you and the recruiter can work together to identify promising late-stage interviewees from previous hiring processes as well as passive candidates who may be interested in switching teams.

Hiring slowdowns often happen in the summer — incidentally, the time when thousands of college students become job-hungry graduates. Though these candidates may require a little extra TLC to train, they can easily make up for their lack of experience in energy and attitude. Working with a recruiter can help you identify the most reliable and ambitious of the bunch.

Hiring vision

Who do you want to hire and how do you plan to keep them? These are the fundamental questions behind “talent acquisition” and “talent management.”

Talent acquisition refers to the process of finding and attracting top-quality candidates, which involves relationship building, branding, and business smarts. Talent management, meanwhile, has to do with retaining and satisfying employees once they’re already on board. Think transparent company structure, workplace flexibility, and a compelling benefits package.

Of course, the two processes aren’t entirely separate. Well-managed talent will boost your organizational reputation, leading to smoother talent acquisition. By the same token, a well-thought-out hiring process will help your company attract candidates that suit their roles and will thus deliver more satisfied and productive employees.

An intelligent talent screening system – the bread and butter of recruiting – paves the way for a smooth acquisition process. This system could involve phone interviews, aptitude tests, or even background checks on social media. Just one caveat: when conducting skills tests, make sure the skills you test are actually required for the job.

Along with traditional screening methods, many recruiters will have state-of-the-art AI tools up their sleeve to help you streamline your search. Advanced software can help predict candidate outcomes, while chatbots can schedule interviews and engage candidates on your website.

It’s a two-way street

Don’t expect magical answers if you haven’t articulated the questions. As an employer working with a recruiter, you’ll have to spell out your requirements. As soon as you can, arrange a meeting with your recruiter, and leave no stone unturned as you lay out what you’re looking for. A basic checklist of qualities doesn’t mean you can’t be flexible – your recruitment plan should include backup strategies to deal with unexpected hiring needs.

Once you’ve outlined your basic requirements, put your micromanaging hat in a drawer and leave the nitty-gritty to the recruiter. That’s what you’re hiring them for, after all. If you’ve done the prep work of articulating your needs and agreeing on a plan, you can trust that the recruiter will leverage their own networks, pre-screening systems, and software solutions to bring you a pool of high-quality candidates.

If you’re looking to expand a particular department or role, do your homework on current top performers. Consider: do they share a similar background, skill set, or personality type? Even better, ask the high flyers themselves what part of their education or experience has served them best on the job. Share their answers with your recruiter, who can use the insights to hone in on your next workplace superstar.

The post-pandemic world also calls for a leaner approach to hiring. Do you need a pipeline of candidates ready to jump in as needed, or can your organization tolerate a waiting period? Talk to your recruiter about your level of risk tolerance and need for hiring efficiency.

Just in time or just in case?

The “just in case” model puts a priority on candidates who are already trained in every skill they may need. While difficult to find, such candidates help you build resiliency. The “just in time” model seeks employees who are trained in a specific skillset and nothing more – and in some cases, called in only when needed. Both models have their perks; it’s budget and company culture that will determine which one to use and when.

HAPPY RECRUITING

Done right, recruiting is not only productive and cost-effective, but enjoyable for everyone involved.

Our Sci.bio recruiters take pride in delivering results and building relationships. They come from a variety of backgrounds, and possess their own wide talent networks to draw from. From general to specific, entry-level to expert, our recruiters can help you fill any po honesty over hype, and will work hard to find a match that makes everyone happy – a win-win-win.

If you’re a recruiter looking to join a team of like minded professionals, searching for efficient and expert assistance filling a role, or you’re interested in more information about how we operate here at Sci.bio, feel free to reach out to us here. We can help you learn how best to leverage our platform and technology to increase your success as a recruiter. We also invite you to browse through our blog posts to get a deeper sense of what recruiting can offer