The Key to Recruiting Success: Social Media 

The Key to Recruiting Success: Social Media 

Social recruiting is no longer a novelty—it’s the cornerstone of a successful recruiting strategy and is an essential tool for businesses looking to market themselves online. Utilizing your social pages and profiles to advertise open positions will help you reduce recruiting costs compared to more traditional methods and is more likely to result in a good cultural match for your company.

Attracting Employees via Social Media

Sharing job openings on social media is a great first step, but you can use these tips to take your company’s social recruitment to the next level.

Spotlight Company Culture

Your business becomes infinitely more relatable when you discuss company culture online. This not only attracts customers and clients, but potential job candidates as well. If someone is already a follower of your company’s social media, there’s a pretty good chance that they connect with you on a personal level and that their values align with your brand. This eliminates the need to ask candidates what they know about your company because they’re already well informed.

Show Off Your Employees

Everyone wants to feel valued. Use your company’s social media to show off your employees and their accomplishments. These images will also show potential candidates what their colleagues would be like and gives them a feel on whether or not they think they could fit into the dynamic. Check out Apple CEO Tim Cook’s Twitter page. He is a great example of showing off and praising employees on a regular basis.

Publish Valuable Content

Potential employees and customers need a reason to follow you. Publishing valuable content is a great way to convince them. The easiest way to expand your reach and then keep those followers is posting at least once per weekday. Share original content or relevant posts from an external source that you believe will benefit your audience.

Use a Social Media Management Platform

Don’t let social media and the need to post on multiple platforms scare you. Programs like Buffer, HootSuite, HubSpot, MeetEdgar, TweetDeck, Sprout Social, etc. brings all of your accounts into one convenient place for you to manage.

Strive for Rich Media

Text-only posts are boring and won’t stand out. In fact, posts on LinkedIn that include images receive 98 percent more comments compared to those that don’t. Adding videos to your posts is another great way to include rich media.

Encourage Employee Participation

Employees [LINK TO IT TAKES A VILLAGE ARTICLE THAT I WROTE] are the face of your brand and encouraging them to share workplace culture will only benefit your recruitment efforts. Follow employees with your company’s accounts and share their posts about work in order to add authenticity to your pages.

social media platforms for job recruiting

Social Platforms

LinkedIn

LinkedIn is the most professional social networking site and boasts over 560 million users. With over 40 million students and recent college graduates on the site, it is a great place to recruit new talent entering the workforce.

The first step to recruiting on LinkedIn is setting up a company page. LinkedIn provides you with the template, so all you have to do is fill in the details. Once your page is set up, it is important to add followers in order to expand your company’s reach.

LinkedIn Recruiter

LinkedIn Recruiter is a platform within the social network created to help recruiters find, connect with and manage candidates. This tool also allows you to connect to your applicant tracking system (ATS) in order to collaborate with others more efficiently, save time, and ensure accuracy across systems.

Groups

Use LinkedIn Groups to connect with other professionals in your field, kind of like a virtual professional association. Posting job openings in those groups will allow you to target the specific candidates you are looking for.

Ads

Use targeted ads to attract potential candidates to your job openings. LinkedIn allows you to hone in on specific people by several factors, including job function, seniority, company name, geography, industry, skills, field of study and more.

Facebook

Facebook is the largest social network with more than 1.5 billion members. The site was originally intended to connect friends, family and coworkers, but has expanded to include organizations, businesses and interests.

Job Openings Tab

Create a custom job openings tab on your Facebook page for current openings. This way, you can attract applicants out of the pool of followers you already have and potentially increase the number of qualified applicants to your open positions.

Ads

Like LinkedIn, Facebook offers targeted ads, which you could use to promote job openings. Facebook Core Audiences helps you select the right recipients for your ad based on several factors such as location, demographics, behavior, connections and interests.

Twitter

According to research, 85 percent of followers feel more connected with a small business after following them on Twitter and 42 percent of Twitter users use the site to learn more about products and services.

Hashtags

Using hashtags will expand your audience by allowing people to find tweets that interest them. The first step is to come up with a hashtag that will be used with all recruitment-related posts. It should be simple, unique and relevant. Starbucks uses #sbuxjobstalk and Disney uses #LifeAtDisney.

It is also wise to use existing broad hashtags so that more people will see your posts. Terms like #jobs, #jobsearch, #jobhunt, #careers and #jobopening will help people find you.

Instagram

Instagram is now the king of social engagement, according to a report by Forrester, so if you want to attract high quality candidates via social media, a business account is a must-have.

Keep it real

Instagram is very visual, so take real photos and video of your products and employees to give potential candidates a sneak peek into what it’s like to work at your company—the work, the play and everything in between. Take Novartis’ lead and share stories from patients who have benefited from using your products.

YouTube

Half of all Internet users (about 1.9 billion users) visit YouTube every month and they watch billions of hours of video. That means that there is a huge untapped pool of potential candidates waiting for you on the social network.

Utilize Video Marketing

Creating a short, fun video about what it’s like to work at your company and why candidates should apply for a job opening is a great way to use video marketing to your advantage.

Your Website or Blog

Don’t forget to create a permanent Careers page on your website to post job listings. This is a great place to link back to from social posts so that candidates can easily find out more information on your company.

3 Steps for Planning a Successful Hire

3 Steps for Planning a Successful Hire

One of the most challenging tasks hiring managers face is properly planning ahead for positions they would like to open later in the year. It’s not uncommon to forget about the leg work that goes into implementing an efficient process for reviewing resumes, which can lead to chaos at crunch time. But, by constructing a game plan early on, hiring managers can cut down the time it takes to interview and give out an offer by half, or even more! Here are a few quick tips on how to best set yourself up for a successful hire:

Start sourcing 3 months before

Many times, I’ve witnessed a company open up a position without doing any planning and they always seem to end up with the same results: unqualified candidates, months of interviews, and candidates turning down their offers.

Closeup on businessman holding a card with text EARLY BIRD CATCHES THE WORM, business concept image with soft focus background and vintage tone

To ensure better results and a talented hire, target candidates three months before opening a position. By doing so, you’ll have a good idea of what the market is currently looking like, and depending on different factors, a chance to make adjustments to the position if needed.

Plus, one of the benefits of searching proactively is that you open up your talent pool to more candidates. Often times, talented candidates are interested in different opportunities in the market, but just aren’t ready to take a gamble yet because they don’t want to leave the security of their current job.

When hiring managers reach out to candidates beforehand, not only does this give them enough time to sell the position and benefits of their company but also gives the candidate enough time to weigh the benefits of the opportunity altogether. A candidate is more likely to leave their current role for a better opportunity when they feel like they are personally being selected by a company.

When the time does come for interviewing, the candidates who were reached out to in advance are likely to perform significantly better in interviews because they’ve had time to properly research and will feel more confident that it’s a beneficial career decision for them. For any contracting/consulting roles, this is also an efficient process because you can target candidates who are finishing up a contract and can transition them smoothly into a new project.

Learn more about finding better candidates

Keep a shortlist of candidates you are interested in and contact them every quarter on company updates

Often times, hiring managers come across professionals who they know would be a great resource to their team. However, they lose out on hiring these candidates because they are often 1. Forgotten about and 2. Aren’t sold enough on their company.

To avoid this, using something as simple as an Excel sheet with candidates and their contact information can save months of interviews. By taking 30 minutes every quarter to send out a quick company update to your hot list, you can establish a pipeline of communication that will always benefit you and your company.

Always keep track of talented candidates who interview well.

I’ve seen many candidates over the years, who met all qualifications of a position and performed phenomenally in the interview stage, lose out to another candidate who may have been internally referred or did just a little better than them.

It’s easy to lose track of these candidates because you feel so confident about the new hire you’re bringing in and you’re pleased that your team is set for the foreseeable future. However, these candidates that lose out often go on and obtain more valuable skills with other opportunities that could benefit your team in the future.

I recommend following up with them once a year to see what type of experience they’re developing. In the world of recruiting, timing is everything, and knowing a candidate who is familiar with your company only helps to lessen the time it takes to re-interview them.

By following these tips year-round, you will not only save time but money as well. For more tips on saving money throughout the recruitment process, check out our post, Quick Hits on How Your Company Can Save on Recruiting Costs.

Selecting Your Recruiter: The Do’s and Don’ts

Selecting Your Recruiter: The Do’s and Don’ts

Hiring is an extensive and rewarding process, but it’s not immune to stagnancy. From long stretches without any fresh candidates to getting turned down when using outreach marketing to advertise your role, many obstacles present themselves in the task of hiring new employees. Sometimes there’s only so much you can do and you need someone else to lend a hand. In these types of situations, it’s often wise to bring in the expertise and support of a third party staffing resource to get the role filled.

Selecting the right recruiter is extraordinarily similar to choosing the right candidate; there are aspects of both technical and cultural fit to consider. In a highly competitive market, many staffing agencies, firms, and companies will do anything possible to place themselves on a preferred vendors list. So, bringing in the right partner is a critical step to not only fill an open position but also to incorporate sustainable growth for your company. But, how do you go about doing so in an honest, efficient, and value-based manner?

Look for honesty.

We’ve all met recruiters who say, “Of course, I can get this filled for you in a week!” or “Everyone I send over will be perfect.” As enticing as these promises may be, accepting such temporary relief will often lead to more stress and long-term headaches. Sourcing for talent is not a step-by-step lab experiment but rather an abstract puzzle; since there isn’t one right answer, you’re often left with many alternate solutions. During the initial introduction call, poor recruiters will emphasize false beliefs so as to impress you and gain your trust. Not to invoke a cliché, but trust should be earned.

Talented and efficient recruiters often walk you through their methodology and approach and discuss how to integrate those with your preferences and your company’s process. Keep an ear out for questions such as, “What have been your pain points in finding competitive candidates?” and “To be frank, there is currently no one in my active pool who fits this role, but I will reach out to my network which has always helped point me in the right direction.”

Find out what their niche is.

Often times, a recruiter will state “Sure, I can work on any role that comes my way!” during their first conversation with you, and in some cases, this could actually serve as a huge benefit if hiring is across multiple departments. For more specialized circumstances, however, that same recruiter may not provide effective resolutions. So, don’t be shy in asking a recruiter specifics regarding their recent and related placements.

When a recruiter has built up a talent pool with direct contacts, they have a natural jump start, which often lends to impressive referrals – a jackpot in our industry. For example, let’s say you have a Senior Medical Science Liaison role that targets an individual with not only a doctorate degree and at least five years of experience, but also hands-on research experience in epilepsy and the flexibility to travel to Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah. Recruiters who have never worked in Medical Affairs roles may have a tough time stepping in and efficiently sourcing for this position. Don’t write them off yet! Rather, inquire about their background in neurological Medical Affairs and their approach for this search. If they mention referring back to a previous search/pool or colleagues who have a related network, then that’s a good start and a potentially good partner for this position!

Set expectations up front.

Possibly, the most antagonizing aspect of hiring is not during ruts, but when issues arise in the contract/agreement phase that puts everything to a grinding halt. When a problem crops up so late in the process, it can be related to a misstep or oversight during early communication efforts. Again, look for honesty. You need to find recruiters who not only value, but also practice it. In the initial call, such issues can be deftly navigated before it proceeds to review. Even after the discussion, ask for paperwork regarding agreements and contracts to be sent over and have your legal team review it.

Moreover, to avoid constant rescheduling and unqualified or non-ideal candidates, be sure to set up a weekly meeting with your recruiter. Hiring will always be an addition to your day-to-day responsibilities, but ten minutes each week of clear communication with your recruiter could save hours later.

At the end of the day, do not let hiring create an unwarranted burden on your business. Staffing resources are vital because finding the right addition to your team will impact how the company grows and even how you develop as a leader.

 

Tools for Setting SMART Goals

Tools for Setting SMART Goals

Setting goals, whether short or long term, is an ongoing and effortful process. Many people tend to set personal and professional goals with a to-do list mindset and superficial consideration. Goal-setting is adeptly illustrated by Aesop’s “The Tortoise and The Hare” fable. When we rush to set goals and consistently compare our progress against others, we become the hare who eventually loses the race. So, let’s take a look at the tortoise’s strategy. And find out how you can begin to set smart goals. 

  1. The hare ran the race to ridicule and beat the tortoise. The tortoise ran the race to prove he could run. They both ran for the specific reason why, a reason that reiterated or added to their self-image. Similarly, start with why you want to set goals in the first place. By understanding the origins of your ambitions, you can discern in which ways your goals will set you up to succeed. When goals tie back into your long-term vision, even if they are short-term in nature, you are much more likely to adhere to them. By framing the why behind the what, you can better define what your goals are and develop strategies to maintain your commitment to them.
  1. The extract above from the fable dually serves as a reminder of how to effectively define our goals. For the hare to be successful, it mattered solely on the tortoise’s progress – not his own. He is not the main character in his definition of success. But, the tortoise established a firm, self-relying reason why he proposed the race. After creating a list of goals, evaluate if how you define success relies on you or others. When you define success in relation to your ability only, you are more readily accepting of difficulties as challenges you can overcome rather than setbacks you cannot surmount. 
  1. The tortoise set an extremely effective goal following the SMART framework: run one marked distance (specific), timed by a judge (measurable), a task he knows he can accomplish (achievable), to prove he can run (relevant), starting as soon as possible (timely). When you adhere to the SMART framework of goal-setting, you provide an effective way to measure your progress towards a goal you know is both doable and supportive of your vision. The more ambiguous you are when defining your goals, the less likely you are in maintaining your drive to achieve them.
  1. As extensive as the process is in setting your goals, the journey to fulfilling them is equally as intensive. Unlike the hare, do not get complacent and procrastinate! The tortoise was able to achieve his goal because he remained steadfast in his pacing and his focus. Be sure to keep your goals in a visible area.  In this way, you will be frequently reminded of your potential destination. Schedule reminders to check on the progress of your goals weekly or biweekly so you can evaluate if your current strategy is effective enough. Goals should not be viewed as something to achieve in the future. They should be seen as daily tasks. If the process of achieving your goal is embedded within your daily routine, then you will be that much more likely to stick to it. 

With the holiday season around the corner, we all have the opportunity to get an early start on our goal-setting for the upcoming year! 

 

Quick Hits on How Your Company Can Save on Recruiting Costs

Quick Hits on How Your Company Can Save on Recruiting Costs

 

Shrink Your Bottom LineHiring “right” can be an expensive, time intensive process. a recruiter or recruiting firm can run the gradient of talent ‘ally’ to ineffective gatekeeper and from a cost perspective: tremendous value to incredible waste of money. It is crucial to fully qualify and be comfortable with the individuals, team or firms that are performing your recruitment as they are a direct reflection on  your company(good or bad). so carefully consider the option you choose. With this in mind,

Regardless of approach, There are a number of things you can do to improve on the quality of your recruitment process so that you can recruit right the first time and avoid employee turnover which can cost as little as 20% for less senior roles and as much as 200% for Executive positions. As a manager, a personal list of the essential qualities and qualifications you want in  your employee, and don’t compromise on them. Retention is the better half of hiring.

Quick Hits:

 

 

Automate

Thanks to technology, you can automate much of the application screening process. It’s a win-win situation. Programs can work around the clock pulling together a short list of top candidates with your required skills and experience and have it waiting on your desk when you arrive in the morning. By saving your time, you will also save your energy for more productive tasks. Undoubtedly, this will lead to higher quality work and thus, more success in your endeavors.

 

Social Media

Where Do Top Performers Hang Out?You don’t need to spend outrageous amounts of money to get your vacancy out to the masses. Social media is a fantastic free resource for finding candidates who are actively looking for work. So, get creative and think about where your top performers hang out! Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are the most popular platforms used by both job seekers and passive candidates. Take the time to connect with passive candidates as well because they may become job seekers tomorrow.

 

One-Click Apply

We don’t just use our cell phones, tablets and other mobile devices to access the web; we’re attached to them. So, if you want to bring in top talent fast, then make your application mobile-friendly. A one-click feature for candidates to apply with, such as a simple tap of the screen, will bring in more potential employees that you imagined.

 

Current Employees

Ask current employees for recommendations. Since they already work for you, your employees understand the value of bringing in contributing employees. Moreover, candidates who have been recommended by current staff have the added benefit of boosting overall workforce morale. We all enjoy going to work when we like the people we work with.

 

Sci.bio RecruitingFind out how Sci.bio Recruiting can help your company take its scientific, clinical and technical hiring to another level. Our scaleable, recruiting services affords our clients maximum flexibility, uncommon value and a high level of scientific and business insight.

 

5 Mistakes to Avoid When Hiring New Graduates

5 Mistakes to Avoid When Hiring New Graduates

Recent medical grads … They’re a picky group. But they are full of creative and innovative ideas although they may be challenged with how the corporate world functions.

They are turning down jobs that don’t meet their needs nowadays. In order to help hire the right graduate for your workforce we put together the 5 mistakes to avoid in the process:

1. Strict work arrangements

Nine to five work days just don’t work anymore. Graduates want to know they are trusted and mrecent gradsore importantly, they want to have flexibility to come into work ‘whenever’ they want. Telling them they can come into work anytime before 10 can go a long way.

Modern millennials and graduates need a work/life balance that is more important than financial reward. Which leads us on to our second mistake to avoid.

2. Throwing cash at them

Nowadays, biopharma graduates are far more committed to their personal learning and development, rather than the amount of money they can make (in some cases). They know that they will make more money as they grow older and progress professionally in the pharmaceutical or biotech industry.

So when hiring someone fresh out of university don’t just focus on the payment package you can offer them, but the development and career progression that you have on offer at your company as well.

Don’t take this the wrong way though, you still have to pay them!

3. Hiring for a grad position but you need 5 years experience

Stop asking graduates for too much experience. A lot of pharmaceuticals recruiters and biotechnology headhunters nowadays tend to hire grads based on their resume, rather than focusing on the eagerness and inquisitiveness of a candidate.

Experience is an important aspect when hiring, but it’s not everything. You will get the best results from hiring a graduate when they have a real interest in the position, a standout work ethic and an eagerness to improve.

4. Rarely charecent gradsllenging them

You have to challenge them! Once these recent grads get bored of the same thing – they will want to leave and explore a more challenging and rewarding position. It’s a need that has to be fulfilled.

If the job fails to challenge, then the interest in the job will eventually fizzle out.

Give them tasks that take them out of their comfort zone, and give them projects that they can lead themselves. Continuously challenge them so that they want to stay and build a future with you.

5. Assuming they always want to leave

Listen, there’s a lot of truth to the fact that graduates and even older millennials enjoy change, especially when it comes to employment. They want to try out different things and see what interests them the most.

But a lot of organizations assume that this is fact and think that you can’t employ a graduate for the long-run. Did you ever think it’s because, as we mentioned before, you’re not challenging them enough or offering them constant development?

Don’t just assume graduates are short-term employees, if you want them to stay then try to avoid the simple mistakes listed in this article and build a future for the very best young talent in your company.